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Sappho

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Everything posted by Sappho

  1. Terry was on the news the other day and being me I forgot which channel he was on so did a search for his name luckily I found something (dated 2004) on another website of which I have reproduced below. The Dominion Post appear to have deleted the story. A lengthy battle to claim what is due 26 January 2004 By GLEN PRENTICE Disabled Terry Sandilands is still fighting for money due from the Accident Compensation Commission almost 11 years after first claiming for assistance. (image not available) STILL FIGHTING: Terry Sandilands has spent more than a decade waiting for compensation to correct a mistake made almost 30 years ago. BILL KEARNS/Dominion Post Mr Sandilands, from Hastings, was left permanently disabled in 1975 when an operation to correct stiffness in his leg went wrong. When he was referred to ACC for compensation payments by a doctor a year later he was told to go to social welfare and apply for a benefit. For 28 years, Mr Sandilands received social welfare benefits instead of higher ACC compensation that would have been based on his pre-injury earnings. He said the drop in income had cost him and his family dearly. "This has cost us our house," Mr Sandilands said. "Now we are living in a bloody rabbit hutch." Mr Sandilands remains angry that he was given the wrong advice by ACC staff back in 1976. "If they had done the right thing in the first place we would not be here today." He lodged a claim for back-payments with ACC in March 1993. ACC denies it gave Mr Sandilands false information but agrees he is entitled to a cash settlement. Last November, he received a $24,600 lump sum payment representing ACC back-payments from May 1988 to October 2003. He now also receives weekly ACC payments. But the corporation is still trying to determine how much he is owed for the period from November 1975 to May 1988. ACC spokesman Fraser Folster said payments for that period had been delayed because Work and Income records for that period were incomplete. "It is not clear the extent to which ACC should reimburse Work and Income for all the sickness benefit payments made to Mr Sandilands during this period," he said, adding this had prevented the corporation from calculating his net payment. Mr Folster said the corporation was investigating whether to make a payment to Mr Sandilands based on estimates. Mr Sandilands said he was unhappy with the $24,600 payment believing it should have been higher. He is also "fed-up" with the continuing delays and angry that he had never been offered an apology. "No one from (ACC) has said `hey, you were right'. No one has thought of my family." He said because of the mistake, he had missed out on the opportunity to be retrained and return to work in another field. Mr Folster said ACC was trying to cut through red tape so Mr Sandilands could get the rest of his money, but the corporation also had to ensure it was acting within the law. Terry Sandilands health has totally deteriorated since 2004 as you can imagine. Anyone that can provide a link to his latest/recent news story would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  2. Sappho

    Ms Leanne McDonnell

    Here's one more I just found - It appears to have a link to the original story. Compo axed for thousands in ACC purge 11.12.2000 - By GEOFF CUMMING Thousands of accident victims have been cut off by ACC in a three-year purge which critics say puts cost-cutting before care. But ACC says the vetting of long-term claimants has weeded out shirkers and people no longer entitled to compensation under its tightly prescribed rules, which are set by Parliament. In the past three years, 42,000 people receiving weekly compensation for 12 months or longer have come off ACC. The number of new claimants who spend a year or more on ACC has fallen from 17,818 in 1996-97 to 11,500 this year. More than 5000 were cut off after "work capacity" assessments, introduced in November 1997 amid projections of ballooning costs. Thousands more have lost their entitlement after medical reviews which find that the pain the victim is experiencing is no longer caused by the original injury. ACC says most people come off compensation because they are better and able to return to the workforce. One woman who feels battle-scarred from her dealings with ACC is Denise Ferris, an Auckland naturopath who suffered partial paralysis and memory loss after a fall which damaged her spine while in Sydney on business last year. The Mangere woman said she had a case manager who appeared not to believe medical evidence about her and spoke to her in a carping way. She said that when she was due to have surgery for internal bleeding the case manager tried to stop the operation, believing she was in for orthopaedic surgery on her back. ACC's falling caseload has helped the state corporation's surplus to soar to $817 million this year, enabling the reduction in employer levies and the return to lump-sum payments announced by ACC Minister Michael Cullen 10 days ago. Full Article Here: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storyprint.cfm?storyID=164674
  3. Sappho

    Ms Leanne McDonnell

    Here's one more I just found - no link to be found from where it original originates from. Believed to be from the SundayStar Times. ACC staff paid bonuses for high 'exit' rate 10 November 2002 By PRAVIN CHAR ACC case managers have received financial rewards for "exiting" patients from the scheme, documents obtained by the Sunday Star-Times reveal. A paper titled "Tail Management", prepared by the corporation for the ACC minister, states claimant exit rate is a key performance indicator for staff. For teams managing the "tail" - claims more than a year old - it says "performance is measured on exit rate". And the team structure "allows for clear objectives and measurements to be in place for staff which impacts on their remuneration". ACC initially denied responsibility for the document, prepared in November 1998 for then ACC Minister Murray McCully. But it was forced to admit responsibility when the Star-Times presented it with a letter signed by McCully confirming the corporation had produced the paper. We are told the key performance indicators for ACC branches are "heavily weighted towards exit rate against target, the exit:entry ratio and duration on the scheme" and that these objectives are "constantly being reinforced at all levels in the organisation by senior management". National's ACC spokesman Paul Hutchison said the document had "very serious implications". "This questions their professionalism," he said. "Patients should be assessed on as objective and best practice guidelines as possible and there should be no financial incentives associated with cases. If it is established that there have been financial incentives there must be an inquiry." A case manager performance assessment form from the same period, used to calculate salary increase, reveals more. Performance targets carry more weighting in the assessment criteria than anything else, making up 40% of the points total. For case managers dealing with intensive management - the "tail" - the two performance criteria are exit rate and tail exits. Exit rate performance is measured in the percentage of claims exited over entry. Greater than 120% is "exceptional" and gives maximum points, 100-119% "exceeds requirements", lowering gradually to less than 90%, which "requires significant improvement". Palmerston North advocate Alan Rowlett, formerly an ACC assistant branch manager who now represents ACC patients, said the revelations came as no surprise. "I've known it for years but the denial from ACC has always been on the fact that staff didn't get direct bonuses, when in fact it's indirect, the most significant part of the criteria for their remuneration package." Barrister and Victoria University senior lecturer John Miller, an authority in ACC law, said when profit became a motivating factor it led to a loss of confidence in the corporation. "This kind of remuneration leads to an adversarial culture between claimants and case managers," he said. "It creates a culture that everyone's a malingerer and the funds of ACC have to be protected." The tail management report was cited by judge Arthur Middleton in May 2000 in his judgement on Carterton tyre worker Sonny Albert's case against ACC. Referring to the passage on remuneration, he stated: "Does that mean that by creating a certain number of `exits' staff will receive a bonus? That would appear to be the implication." The document states the referred providers programme "involves the obtaining of second opinions from appropriate providers where medical certificates are being unreasonably extended", appearing to imply that the corporation will obtain opinions for the purpose of exiting claimants. Mervyn Castle, president of the Society for the Promotion of Accident Victims (Spav), said he had encountered this situation many times. "In one case a boy was sent to 18 different doctors and specialists until on the 18th they got the report they wanted," he said. "If case managers do not get the answer they want, they persist, persist, repeat, repeat." The paper also said up to 1997, ACC's ability to exit claimants was restricted to "pressure and claimant agreement". It goes on to state "The introduction of the work capacity assessment process has provided a vehicle to change that", a clear implication the assessment's aim was solely to cut the tail. "This was the express purpose of the work capacity assessments, no one can say it was not," added Castle. "This is evidence of the chicanery and fraud that is going on." Since the tail management document was prepared, the work capacity assessments have been replaced by vocational independence assessments. New ACC laws which came into effect in April put a greater focus on injury prevention and rehabilitation. It specifies that claimants must now be assessed on whether they have a capacity to work for 35 hours or more a week, rather than 30. ACC said the report was "a historical document under a previous government and a previous administration with different policies". It repeated this comment relentlessly and refused to answer any questions on the paper or answer directly whether the corporation was accountable for its practices at that time. "ACC is accountable to the government of the day," it said.
  4. Sappho

    Ms Leanne McDonnell

    Reproduced from elsewhere I have no idea where the story was originally copied from as no link provided on other site where I found the story. Beneficiaries in for the fast fix 01 February 2004 By RACHEL GRUNWELL and MATTHEW LOWE Hundreds of sickness and invalid beneficiaries will be fast-tracked through the health system and back at work by the end of the year, if a trial scheme starting this month is successful. The number of people claiming the benefits has soared to about 113,000 and is increasing at a rate of more than 10 a day at a cost of about $1.5 billion a year. Social Development Minister Steve Maharey said the scheme - being trialled in south Auckland - to take beneficiaries off public health waiting lists and give them private treatment, could be rolled out nationwide within the year. Treating people quickly and getting them back into the workforce is predicted to save taxpayers millions of dollars a year in benefit payments. A similar scheme adopted by the Accident Compensation Corporation in 1997 has saved the organisation $4 billion. "We've been doing a lot of work with ACC on how a larger model can work and we are pretty convinced we can make a difference," said Maharey. Ministry of Social Development spokeswoman Katrina Ings said 500 beneficiaries will be asked to volunteer for a trial in Manukau, starting this month. They will be approached by workers, including doctors and the local district health board, who will identify people they think can be more easily treated and helped back into employment. Ings said the trial will take two years but they would not wait until the end of the pilot to decide if it was a success. "It's the first time we've done anything like this. It's a brave move. We are moving way beyond the limits of what a welfare agency normally considers." The number of people on sickness and invalids benefits has increased by 33% in five years. Invalids benefits are awarded to people with a permanent sickness, injury or disability that stops them working and costs the government about $13m a week. This year the ministry predicted 83,000 people would be dependent on invalid benefits by 2007, costing taxpayers an extra $4m a week. Maharey said they were conducting research into what doctors do when dealing with these beneficiaries, how case managers operate and how many people could be helped into work if they received treatment sooner. "If we can understand better the reasons why people are on the benefits and get a much better understanding of how we can tailor our services to people moving off the benefit then I will be pretty happy. Medical Association chairwoman Tricia Briscoe said the scheme had a lot of potential. "It is upsetting for doctors to be caring for patients they know they could help back into work or normal life with access to the required treatment. "This scheme could shorten waiting lists and would be good for the mental health of people on benefits to be out working again." The National Party's social services spokeswoman Katherine Rich called upon the government to introduce the measures nationwide as soon as possible. "It's something that would work immediately. It is something that can get potentially productive people back into the workforce and has to be a priority for government." Well Blurb, it doesn't take an idiot to see what the ACC were up to between 1998/9 and 2004ish. But then, there are still people in NZ that believe the ACC are as honest, and caring, as they make themselves out to be, that is reason I post these stories here to back up what you are alleging in all your posts. ACC are corrupt and should never be trusted. There was a massive cover-up by the ACC and from higher places because from around 2000 and 2001 ACC's long term claimants (Tail-enders) exiting scam was starting to be uncovered. Four companies were given case management contracts. One was AON and another was Catalyst, a company owned and operated by the ACC!
  5. Sappho

    Ms Leanne McDonnell

    Reproduced from elsewhere Originally from the SundayStar Times Doctors put ACC bullies on blacklist SUNDAY , 13 OCTOBER 2002 By PRAVIN CHAR Doctors are blacklisting some ACC case managers, whom they claim are seeking biased medical assessments to get patients off the scheme. Professor Des Gorman, head of occupational medicine at Auckland University, said Accident Compensation Corporation case managers had approached him to produce this kind of report. To avoid accusations of being "ACC hitmen", he said the university had compiled a blacklist of managers it would no longer deal with. "As soon as we suspected we were dealing with managers who were after a particular outcome, that we were being used, we didn't deal with them. In other instances they have got angry when they didn't get the report they wanted." Gorman's claims have been backed by medical experts across New Zealand. Dr Harvey Williams, a Christchurch psychiatrist who has patients referred to him by ACC, described the problem not as "bad apples" but as a "bad culture". "I think at times the ACC think they are buying a report rather than paying for a report. The whole ACC thing is to get as many people off their books as possible. "When one case manager received a report there was a lot of disappointment because it wasn't what she wanted. I felt the best way to deal with it was for her to put it in writing - wisely she didn't do that." Dr Peter Robinson, senior lecturer at Auckland Medical School and formerly the ACC's corporate medical adviser, now runs the Medical Protection Society. He revealed he too had blacklisted several ACC managers. "I will now accept referrals from only about four case managers who I know and trust and have blacklisted at least half a dozen," he said. "There is an inference that certain opinions are expected and there are people whose opinions are not balanced. "I had a recent situation where I was told by ACC to amend my report. I have gone back to them saying I will answer queries but I will not change my opinion." There were suggestions case managers were given bonuses for putting people off the scheme. Wellington occupational and aviation medicine specialist Peter Dodwell, who has handled hundreds of ACC cases, believes the managers are simply following orders. Wellington barrister Hazel Armstrong, a former ACC board member involved in medico-legal litigation for more than 15 years, said it was increasingly difficult to get an independent medical opinion. "The majority of case managers I have dealt with are looking for ways of getting people off the scheme." But ACC chief executive Garry Wilson said he was unaware of any inappropriate behaviour by case managers. "ACC uses more than 1000 doctors or medical academics for assessments of claimants and none has contacted ACC expressing concerns about the conduct of ACC staff," he said. Any doctors who had concerns about ACC should go to him, he said. "ACC finds it difficult to believe doctors or medical academics feel pressured by case managers." ACC Minister Ruth Dyson refused to comment but National's ACC spokesman Dr Paul Hutchison insisted an investigation was vital, saying constituents had complained about ACC decisions.
  6. 'Hug of death' asbestos case ACC win is too late for victim 17:05, Jul 08 2019 https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/114080024/hug-of-death-asbestos-case-acc-win-is-too-late-for-victim
  7. Sappho

    Why we are here

    I grabbed the following words from accforum org because it would be hard to beat! It's factual! I found the part I've quoted within a post published by "Brucey" in accforum org's members only forum/section and thought the message deserved to be seen by more than just 2 or 3 members that still visit and login to that once thriving forum! I'm grateful this site is here for us and can see this new accforum.nz evolving into being that rose thorn in ACC's arse that accforum org once was!
  8. Found this in Stuff Blind and visually impaired people want e-scooters off the footpath for good https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/111820308/blind-and-visually-impaired-people-want-escooters-off-the-footpath-for-good
  9. A small Correction to the above It should be illegal to use a cellphone to TALK* and or TxT while walking on any footpath/walkway/walking/tramping track within New Zealand! * Emergency calls excluded.
  10. Here is something thats being bugging me for quite some time now. It is against the law to use your cellphone while driving on our roads. It is not illegal to use your cellphone while riding an e scooter on the footpath It is not illegal to use your cellphone while riding bicycles on our roads It should be illegal to use a cellphone to txt while walking on any footpath/walkway/walking/tramping track within New Zealand!
  11. I hear on the radio talk-back the other day something about there now being 3 or 4 competitor e scooter companies operating on numerous footpaths in various locations within New Zealand. Soon our footpaths will become congested with e scooters, foot traffic, kids riding bikes/e bikes, and mobility vehicles! Maybe ALL e scooters should only be ridden on the dedicated cycle lanes, and banned from our footpaths! It be much safer for us who use the footpaths to walk on, kids to ride their bikes on, grandfather and/or grandmother to drive their mobility scooters on ....
  12. ACC spent six months and $17,000 fighting a Wellington stroke victim's claim https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/111866009/acc-spent-nine-months-and-18000-fighting-a-wellington-stroke-victims-claim In some cases ACC have spent much much more fighting injury claims! And lets not forget that the money they spend fighting injury claims comes out of the ACC Levy Payers Fund account! Your money!
  13. Sappho

    Why we are here

    I reproduced what you wrote on that other forum mate because what you wrote was bang on the mark! People wanting to help themselves try and get fair go from ACC are wasting their time at accforum,org because there is hardly anyone to help. That butler person still gives me the creeps but for tomas I'm over his same old same old dribble. I'm hoping magnacarter and others like mini, ntv, hukildaspida, huggy, fairgo, anon and others etc come over here. That old team at accforum.org were the best! I hope they all join here and this place start annoying the sheat out of acc
  14. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/108759109/acc-spying-its-nothing-less-than-warfare Yeah right! ACC is represented by lawyers at MOST of the review and appeal hearings. If they are busy they use the telephone - speaker phone ACC made 802,099 payments totaling $131m for medical assessments Some of ACC's toadies must be doing very well, extremely well!
  15. Sappho

    Lime Scooters

    ACC pays out $740,000 for e-scooter-related injuries in five months Danielle Clent14:01, Mar 08 2019 https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/111121216/acc-pays-out-740000-for-escooterrelated-injuries-in-five-months BAN LIME Scooters before people start getting KILLED!
  16. Sappho

    Lime Scooters

    Don't forget that here in NZ we can't sue anyone for causing injury We apparently gave up the right to sue way back when Rob was in control. In return he gave us the ACC - a fairer system to the injured party - yeah right! 3 Billion is it? ACC have an estimated three (3) Billion NZ Dollars in their bank account! Levy Payers money that should be used to rehabilitate injured people to same level prior to injury Its not happening! There are still hundreds and hundreds (1000's to be honest) of genuinely injured individuals in NZ that end up being assisted by WINZ when ACC declines claim or interferes with assessment process to exit claimant from their rightful entitlements way before client actually medically fit and no longer requires help from acc! ACC merely transfers their obligations to winz. ACC is funded by a Compulsory ACC Levy on just about everything in NZ which nearly everyone pays in some way or another WINZ is funded by the NZ Tax Payer. The NZ Tax payer is helping the ACC get richer and richer Meanwhile WINZ is always asking the NZ Govt for money to help keep going We're actually paying to be compulsorily covered in two ways. eh
  17. Sappho

    Lime Scooters

    Lime e-scooters off Auckland and Dunedin streets over wheel-locking issue Caroline Williams and Oliver Lewis20:07, Feb 22 2019 https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/110806313/lime-escooters-ordered-off-auckland-streets-following-safety-concerns > "We want to solve this. We want action." Totally agree, Ban the bloody things! Issue solved!
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