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This forum is dedicated to the memory of Ken "Tomcat" Miller R.I.P. who sadly passed away on Thursday 30th August 2018.

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  1. Protester apologises to ACC for 'over the top' protest, New Plymouth court hears Deena Coster13:32, Mar 12 2019 A man who drove his car into the front entrance of the New Plymouth ACC branch, live streaming his protest over the internet, has met with a representative of the national insurer to say sorry, a court heard. On Tuesday, Paul Martyn Smith was sentenced in the New Plymouth District Court on two charges connected to a December 20 incident at the city's ACC office on Molesworth St. https://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/111206117/protester-apologises-to-acc-for-over-the-top-protest-new-plymouth-court-hears
  2. The day after being miraculously found of having a capacity to work it was again miraculously found that I was unfit due to the same injuries, but this time I found myself on a sickness benefit!
  3. Alpha fees 'commercially sensitive' 26 March 2004 By SID PICKERING ACC is refusing to say how much it is paying a company that provides meditation and "laughing therapy" as ways to encourage claimants back into the workforce. Alpha Consultants has been ridiculed in Parliament by New Zealand First leader Winston Peters. He told how claimants were "required to sit cross-legged on the floor with their thumbs in their ears humming and...to stand in a paddock and laugh at each other." Alpha charges the taxpayer $12,000 to $20,000 for each six-week course it provides. But ACC's Healthwise division general manager David Rankin refused to say how many courses Alpha did each year. That information was "commercially sensitive" because it would allow people to work out how much Alpha's contract was worth, he said. Alpha was one of 25 to 30 companies ACC contracted to provide the programmes. Alpha was contracted to provide courses for eight to 20 people at any one time. There were nine people doing the course at Hamilton's Old Boys Rugby Club. The company also had offices at Tauranga, Auckland and Dargaville. People were required to take part in such programmes if their GP said there was no medical reason why they could not and their case manager believed it was best for them, but they could opt out, ACC said. Dr Rankin said the corporation offered the courses five days a week for six weeks to try to introduce structure back into people's lives. At any one time there were 200 to 250 people involved in such courses nationwide. Each programme was run by qualified health professionals, Dr Rankin said. "There is a standard set of aims and goals for the programme, each person is at liberty to run their own syllabus." He said the course was "extremely effective" and that about 65 per cent of people that do it were back in the workforce or actively job seeking within three months of finishing. The Times invited the Alpha to comment about its business, but it refused. The company's Hamilton branch manager Catherine Hodges said she had been told not to comment. "Maybe in the next two or three months I can." Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Stuff appears to have been removed. http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/waikatotimes/0,2106,2856747a6579,00.html
  4. All a bit potty for ACC claimants 26 March 2004 What happens when Alpha Consultants run a course for ACC? Sid Pickering finds out from three people who are currently taking part in the six-week programme. Paul Wheeler knew things were "getting a little bit weird" in the first week of a course he was sent on by ACC. The six-week course, paid for by ACC, is provided by Alpha Consultants in Hamilton. It champions meditation, "laughing therapy" and, until yesterday, nasal enemas as a way of helping ACC claimants back to work. Not long after the course began, Mr Wheeler was encouraged to "stand around in a group and just look at each other". He was told it stimulates laughing, but Mr Wheeler did not find it funny, and refused to do it. "It's not rehabilitating me back into the workforce," the Te Awamutu former rugby player said. He also refused to do the nasal enemas which were administered by a yoga expert through a teapot. "You put the teapot with salt water in it in one nostril and let the water flow out the other nostril. They said it stimulated the mind, it was a cleansing process. "It's quite humiliating when you talk to friends and family about it. `What did you do today? I almost stuck a teapot in my nose."' Mr Wheeler said the more than $300 he has already been paid to travel from Te Awamutu to Hamilton to attend the course would be better spent on a six-month gym membership to rehabilitate his foot which was injured on the rugby field eight months ago. Hamilton's Liz Bartlett said while she respected the beliefs of other people it was unfair to force them on ACC claimants. "If we don't go to this course, we get our ACC cut. We have the right to be treated as individuals. I'm angry about this because I'm a taxpayer too, and I should not be paying for it." Ms Bartlett said the meditation involved "putting your thumbs in your ears and humming". But the final straw for her was being sat down to watch the movie One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. "They said it was a documentary about life. I think it's a great movie, but I don't think the taxpayer should be paying for me to watch it." Valerie Pahl, who injured her wrist in an accident during her factory job in February last year, said the meditation sessions were on at 11am, and it was a "terrible time to be lying around on your back". ACC required her to do another more active course, and the combination of the two courses aggravated her wrist injury because it was not getting enough rest, she said. After speaking to the Times yesterday, the trio returned to the course, being held at Old Boys Rugby Club in Hamilton. They are in their fifth week. "Heaven help you if you break your leg," Mr Wheeler said. "It could be you next." ACC ordered Alpha to stop offering nasal enemas to claimants yesterday. The enemas "overstepped the mark" of the support Alpha was contracted to provide, ACC said. Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Stuff appears to have been removed. http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/waikatotimes/0,2106,2856746a6579,00.html
  5. "Struth, Ruth!" written by Rod Hinchco - 25 March, 2004 "The Truth Ruth." Ah Mate.! She's at it again. Everyday almost, no matter where you turn, it is likely that it will be Ruth Dyson in the headlines. Just these last 7 days it has gone from allegedly misleading the house, and via the media at least, misleading the public. Now, her former cabinet colleague Lianne Dalziel got the right royal shaft from the Queen of Spin herself, Helen of Helengrad, for doing something similar, so why is it that Ruth manages to come out the other end of countless brushes, covered in roses? I mean, she is never even made to account for her utterances, or misdeeds, save that is for temporarily getting the bum's rush for a DIC, and like I say, that was very temporary. But in fairness, she is not alone. When Helen was flavor of the month, her believers unquestioningly accepted what she said was right and Ministers were given the benefit of a sliver of doubt if one existed, or were given time to concoct one, to slip out from under. That's why I say, ignorance of the law is only an acceptable defense for District Court Judges and Cabinet Ministers. ACC as you now well know, is one of Ruth's portfolios, and yesterday I took up Winston Peters tip on the belittling treatment dished out to ACC claimants that included Nasal Enemas that one contracted health provider subjected claimants to. They've stopped. According to ACC Healthwise GM, David Rankin, and I assume that is his real name and not a pseudonym. They,. Nasal Enemas were Offered to claimants he said. Anyone out there want to back up the information I already have and say that they were prescribed, rather than offered as an option? Drop me a line. As for the requirement to stand facing each other across a paddock and laughing out loud, or sitting cross legged with your thumbs in your ears humming, well they are to stay he says, as they are standard techniques used around the world for relaxation. (and intimidation, belittlement etc.) He also defended the requirement to watch the movie One flew over the cuckoo's nest the story of life within a mental asylum as he says it is seen as a tool for stimulating discussion about overcoming difficulties. Is it really? Or is it again, intimidation or belittlement, designed to frustrate, and break one's resolve? Rankin went on to say, "These people have suffered a significant injury. They are off work. They are being encouraged by case managers to get back into work. All three of those things are stressful." "People with serious injuries get into the habit of watching TV all day, getting up at midday, and lose the routine, lose some of the self-presentation skills. "This course is a structured program to get people out of bed, presenting at 9 o'clock every morning to a certain place (and) organising their transport." About 65 per cent of the people who went through programs in Waikato either found jobs within three months or were actively seeking jobs. Before doing the courses they had all been on ACC for six months or more, had become dependent on ACC benefits "and were showing no motivation at all about looking for or finding a job". And this, to my way of thinking, about sums up ACC's attitude to their so called clients, you and I. Joe and Jenny Public. Now I, recently suffered a shoulder injury. A pathway gave way under me sending me crashing down an embankment. The ACC prescribed and supported treatment was a trip to my GP, for which I paid a surcharge (a dubious requirement under ACC's own articles) and ten sessions with a physiotherapist. All up, after paying ACC's surcharges, which incidentally doubled once ACC decided that the public wouldn't stand another levy (tax) increase, I'm out of pocket about $180. At the end of that prescribed and supported treatment, I was miraculously cured according to ACC, and the continued loss of the full use of my left arm, and the pain and discomfort were purely figments of my imagination. Had it not been for Peters raising this issue with Dyson and the practice in her own words being "an appropriate component of the course", I would be lining up to be offered nasal enemas. Under normal circumstances, before this much maligned no blame abomination we suffer, I could have sued the owner of that walkway for the costs of my treatment and due recompense for lost wages, not to mention pain and suffering. It was a formed access way that I was fully entitled to use, and its owner or those responsible for its maintenance were clearly liable, as was the case with DOC at Cave Creek for instance. Dyson's next Boo Boo came while being legitimately questioned by National MP, Katherine Rich, a member of a Parliamentary Select Committee, Dyson referred to Ms Rich as an Irresponsible tart. Ms Rich, rightly, took umbrage at being called a promiscuous woman or prostitute and demanded an apology. Dyson denied making such a comment, even after being offered a chance to study a taped playback of the incident, saying "It's not the usual sort of language I'd use," She did later however, accept that she had passed such a remark, and gave a halfhearted apology saying, "Katherine Rich is wrong about unallocated cases". "My under-the-breath comment about Ms Rich was not intended to be on the record and was simply a measure of my frustration at her attempt to make political advantage out of notifications of child abuse and neglect. I apologise for any offence I may have caused her." But Minister.these cases exist. They are part of the reason this Government is the subject of international ridicule and criticism. You can take it from this then that the questioning was at the time, about another of Dyson's portfolios, and the select committee were asking her questions about the shuffling of CYF referral lists of children at risk of abuse, which she categorically denied was taking place. There were incidentally, 5331 cases of child neglect and abuse, unallocated as at that time. Labour, unfortunately, has an appalling record when it comes to child health and welfare. We have seen it time and again. Children abandoned by ACC even, in their time of need. We have seen the Minister of Health right off a tiny babies life as a humanitarian thing and then stand by while that child is virtually committed to death without any chance being taken on her account, to improve her chances. Hopefully, by next week I will be able to lift the warps on "why it is virtually impossible to secure the services of a neurologist for an ACC assessment" and why, almost all of them say, "we don't do work associated with ACC". And why, referrals almost always come right back to one man. A man well established as an ACC Consultant, with a good record of Exits. I will be taking an in-depth look into toxic poisoning in the workplace. What we are doing about it, and ACC's attitude toward it. Join me then, as I attempt to Write The Wrongs. Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Kiwinews appears to have been removed. http://www.kiwinews.co.nz/cgi-bin/editor/print.pl?article=4016
  6. ACC halts nose jobs, keeps on laughing 26.03.2004 By AINSLEY THOMSON and KEVIN TAYLOR Nasal irrigation is no longer on offer at a controversial ACC rehabilitation course, but the laughter and humming will go on. ACC yesterday told Alpha Consultants, which it employs to run the six-week course in the Waikato, that it was not to repeat the nasal irrigation exercise because it was a type of medical treatment and the company was not contracted to offer it. But other components of the course, such as getting participants to sit on the floor with their thumbs in their ears and hum, stand in a paddock and laugh at each other, and watch videos such as Patch Adams, will continue. "Humming is a yoga practice that is intended to raise self-awareness and block out distractions," ACC said. "Laughter releases endorphins, which also help with pain management." At any given time between 200 and 250 people on ACC around New Zealand do the programme, which is meant to introduce structure back into their lives so they can move back to fulltime employment. In the 2002-03 year the Government spent $910,900 on work preparation programmes. The unusual treatment offered on the programme was highlighted in Parliament this week by New Zealand First leader Winston Peters, who had been contacted by a woman on the course. Yesterday, the woman, Liz Bartlett, spoke to the Herald. Ms Bartlett is in the fifth week of the course, which she has been made to do as part of her rehabilitation after an operation on her shoulder. The 50-year-old Hamilton woman believes the course is a waste of taxpayers' money. "My needs are physical, not mental," she said. "I don't need mental preparation to go back to work." Ms Bartlett, who ran a distribution company before her injury, said the course should focus more on rehabilitation such as gym and physiotherapy work. She had tried the nasal irrigation exercise run by a Hamilton yoga instructor known as Kailash. "I'm not ridiculing his beliefs, but why do I need to do that? How is that rehabilitating my shoulder? "And sitting down meditating with my thumbs in my ears and humming - how is that helping my shoulder?" Kailash told the Herald that he had been doing nasal irrigation for years and knew many other people who also did it. He had had a positive response from people who did the ACC course. When yoga was applied to medical conditions it could "bring great improvement very quickly", he said. ACC said it knew that "yoga relaxation techniques" had been used, but did not know specifically that nasal irrigation would be employed. Yesterday in Parliament, Mr Peters asked ACC Minister Ruth Dyson why "a woman with a bad shoulder needs a teapot of salt water up her nose". She said the practice was "not appropriate" for the provider to offer even although it was offered on a voluntary basis. But she then defended the practice, saying some people suffered from sinus irritation and it was considered one of the non-drug related treatments that was helpful. She denied a claim by Mr Peters that private providers of ACC rehabilitation services were paid a bonus for each client moved from their books on to the books of Work and Income New Zealand. She said it was standard that individual providers received additional payments for a "successful outcome" but transferring somebody to Winz was not such an outcome. Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on NZHerald appears to have been removed. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?thesection=news&thesubsection=&storyID=3557067
  7. Stop 'nasal enemas' ACC tells contractor 26 March 2004 By NICK VENTER An ACC contractor has been told to stop offering accident victims nasal irrigation as part of a back-to-work programme. The instruction was issued by ACC Healthwise general manager David Rankin a day after NZ First leader Winston Peters ridiculed a Hamilton programme in which participants were offered "nasal enemas", required to sit cross-legged on the floor humming, laugh at each other and watch One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Mr Rankin said he had instructed course provider Alpha Consultants to stop offering nasal irrigation because a medical treatment was not an appropriate part of a work-preparation programme. However, he defended the humming and "laughter therapy", saying they were standard relaxation techniques taught around the world. "These people have suffered a significant injury. They are off work. They are being encouraged by case managers to get back into work. All three of those things are stressful." He also defended the movie-watching, saying One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was a tool for stimulating discussion about overcoming difficulties. Work-preparation programmes offered to about 2000 people a year nationwide were extremely successful, he said. About 65 per cent of the people who went through programmes in Waikato either found jobs within three months or were actively seeking jobs. Before doing the courses they had all been on ACC for six months or more, had become dependent on ACC benefits "and were showing no motivation at all about looking for or finding a job". The main purpose of the programmes was to put structure back into people's lives, he said. "People with serious injuries get into the habit of watching TV all day, getting up at midday, and lose the routine, lose some of the self-presentation skills. "This course is a structured programme to get people out of bed, presenting at 9 o'clock every morning to a certain place (and) organising their transport." In Parliament yesterday, Mr Peters asked ACC Minister Ruth Dyson to explain why "a woman with a bad shoulder needs a teapot of salt water up her nose". Ms Dyson said nasal irrigation was not an appropriate component of the course and was no longer being offered. Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Stuff appears to have been removed. http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/dominionpost/0,2106,2855857a6030,00.html
  8. ACC defends nasal irrigation 25 March 2004 A senior ACC official today defended injury rehabilitation programmes that include such techniques as nasal irrigation, humming and yoga. The programmes were highlighted yesterday when New Zealand First leader Winston Peters asked ACC Minister Ruth Dyson what she was doing about people being forced to go through the schemes or face losing their payments. "(One scheme) in the Waikato requires accident victims to undertake a nasal enema by pouring water into their noses, sit cross-legged on a floor with their thumbs in their ears humming and also being forced to stand in a paddock and laugh at each other," Mr Peters said. The technique known as nasal irrigation involves pouring salted water in one nostril and out the other. Today ACC Healthwise division general manager David Rankin told National Radio such programmes ran five days a week for six weeks to try to introduce structure back into people's lives. "It's extremely effective, 65 per cent or more of people that go into the programme are back in the workforce or actively job-seeking within three months of finishing the course," Dr Rankin said. "At any one time we'll have about 200 to 250 people, ACC claimants on the programme, and as part of that the psychologist offering the programme will develop a syllabus that involves a wide range of services to help people get through some of the after-effects of their injury." People were required to take part in such programmes if their GP said there was no medical reason why they could not and their case manager believed it was best for them, but they were given a choice about the components and could opt out. "We take three approaches. We look at their psychological needs. We look at their physical needs, help them to get fit, and we look at their vocational needs, helping them to get skills to return to the workforce," Dr Rankin said. "Humming is very much part of the process of relaxation and we believe that it is an appropriate component to the programme. The nasal irrigation was offered to claimants after they recognised that it may be a therapy that would be of help to them. It was voluntary to participate. It goes beyond the requirements of the programme and gets into medical treatment which was not appropriate in this situation." The psychologist coordinating the Waikato programme referred to by Mr Peters had discussed at some length with the nine participants what they would like to do. They had identified yoga but it was voluntary and he understood two of the members chose not to participate, Dr Rankin said. A reputable yoga teacher had been engaged and following individual sessions with this person, the participants had been offered a nasal irrigation instruction programme. Following the instruction, five of the nine participants had bought some equipment because they felt the service was useful, Dr Rankin said. The provider normally got people to watch the movie Patch Adams, but that had not been available, so as a second choice One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest had been chosen. "I'm sure if you'd watched the movie, you would realise it deals with a number of very important psychological issues." Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Stuff appears to have been removed. http://stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2855563a11,00.html
  9. ACC blocks nasal enemas 25 March 2004 By SID PICKERING AND NZPA ACC has told a Hamilton health consultant to stop offering its clients nasal enemas. Alpha Consultants is contracted by ACC to help people back to work. Yesterday details of its six-week course were ridiculed in Parliament by New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters. He told how claimants doing the course were "required to undertake a nasal enema by pouring water into their noses, sit cross-legged on the floor with their thumbs in their ears humming and...to stand in a paddock and laugh at each other". Nasal enemas was one of a number of left-field practices the company championed. Today ACC said Alpha Consultants "overstepped the mark" by providing nasal enema's to its clients. David Rankin, general manager of Healthwise, the ACC division which oversees the corporation's contracts, said the aim of the six-week course was to provide people encouragement to get back to work, not medical treatment. He said ACC had told Alpha Consultants to stop the practice. But Dr Rankin defended other techniques, including "laughing therapy", saying they were clinically sound and had proven benefits. The six-week course was run by medical professionals and he was confident it was suitable. Alpha Consultants is paid to help ACC claimants back into to work. The company's contract was renewed this year until 2006. There were eight to 20 people on the course at any one time. Alpha Consultants, which is registered in Tauranga and has a Hamilton branch, was the only contractor which included nasal irrigation in its programme. Alpha Consultants says on its website it was established to offer a needs driven "occupational rehabilitation service to claimants in the Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Waikato, Coromandel, and surrounding areas". The "outcomes" were achieved by working in a holistic environment that would motivate and inspire self-confidence in the claimants. ACC Minister Ruth Dyson was taken by surprise when Mr Peters raised the course in Parliament. Asked by Mr Peters how "such seemingly pointless exercises" could assist with rehabilitation, she said she would investigate. "It is new information to me. It is information that I find very interesting and I will be following it up with some vigour." Alpha Consultants refused to comment about the course, and referred the Waikato Times to the ACC. Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on Stuff appears to have been removed. http://stuff.co.nz/stuff/waikatotimes/0,2106,2855585a6004,00.html
  10. Nasal enemas, humming and yoga in ACC recipe 25.03.2004 ACC has been accused by New Zealand First leader Winston Peters of funding "bizarre" injury rehabilitation programmes, including nasal enemas, humming and being forced to stand in a paddock and laugh. The treatment included watching the movie One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest on video. The participants included former Chiefs player Paul Miller, who told TV3 last night that he felt the treatment was "degrading". Miller was getting treatment after he ruptured a tendon in his foot. One woman said she felt humiliated watching Cuckoo's Nest, which starred Jack Nicholson and was set in a mental hospital. Mr Peters asked ACC Minister Ruth Dyson what she was doing about people being forced to go through the schemes or face losing their payments. "[One scheme] in the Waikato requires accident victims to undertake a nasal enema by pouring water into their noses, sit cross legged on a floor with their thumbs in their ears humming and also being forced to stand in a paddock and laugh at each other," Mr Peters said. "How can she have any confidence whatsoever that such seemingly pointless exercises provide any genuine rehabilitative qualities or effect?" Ms Dyson said Mr Peters had probably given her more information than she needed. "But it is new information to me. It is information that I find interesting and I will be following it up with some rigour," she said. Most rehabilitation programmes did good work for accident victims, the minister added. Mr Peters asked what ACC did to ensure the people they hired were "sane" or whether there was more than one "fruitloop" out there. Ms Dyson said a number of people provided rehabilitation in different areas and most people were satisfied with their treatment. Mr Peters said one of his constituents, a 50-year-old woman, went through the treatment programme for a long-term shoulder injury. "She is deeply upset that she is being treated like an idiot," Mr Peters said. ACC last night said there were no plans to extend the course beyond the Waikato. The rehabilitation programme, aimed at helping claimants prepare for work or independence, had "optional elements that included yoga relaxation techniques". It was made clear to the nine ACC claimants they did not have to participate in the nasal irrigation, which was introduced to improve their ability to cope with pain. "The treatment provider is emphatic that no one was forced to take part in the yoga techniques," ACC said. The woman referred to by Mr Peters had voluntarily taken part in the yoga nasal irrigation. "Five of the nine on the course found sufficient benefit from the technique to purchase extra equipment so they could continue the yoga nasal irrigation at home, including the woman." ACC said most of the nine claimants had complained of sinus problems or headaches. "The yoga master supervising the techniques spent 20-30 minutes with each claimant and identified that most had sinus problems and/or headaches. "So the yoga nasal irrigation and other pain management techniques such as humming and laughter were deemed appropriate. "Humming is ... intended to raise self-awareness and block out distractions. Laughter releases endorphins, which also help with pain management." Sourced and reproduced here from: http://accforumorg Original story on NZHerald appears to have been removed. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?thesection=news&thesubsection=&storyID=3556824
  11. Sourced & Reproduced from: http://stuff.co.nz/stuff/dominionpost/0,2106,2854719a6000,00.html Tax-funded therapy gets up your nose 25 March 2004 By NICK VENTER ACC claimants in Waikato are being given nasal irrigation to help prepare them for a return to work. The technique, which involves pouring salted water in one nostril and out the other, is one of several unconventional practices being championed by a company contracted to the Accident Compensation Corporation. NZ First leader Winston Peters told Parliament yesterday that claimants doing the six-week course were "required to undertake a nasal enema by pouring water into their noses, sit cross-legged on the floor with their thumbs in their ears humming and . . . to stand in a paddock and laugh at each other". The treatment of one woman with a long-term shoulder injury included watching the movie One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest on video, he said. But ACC spokesman Fraser Folster said the nasal irrigation and laughter sessions were voluntary. Most of the nine claimants on the course brought to Mr Peters' attention had complained of sinus problems or headaches to the yoga master supervising the techniques. "So the yoga nasal irrigation and other pain management techniques such as humming and laughter were deemed appropriate," he said. "Humming is a yoga practice that is intended to raise self-awareness and block out distractions. Laughter releases endorphins which also help with pain management." Most of those who did the course had found the techniques beneficial, he said. Five, including a woman who complained to Mr Peters, had bought equipment to continue the nasal irrigation at home. Mr Folster said ACC was trying several techniques "which might look a bit off the wall" to help claimants who had extra difficulties. Alpha Consultants, the company providing the Hamilton course, was the only contractor that included nasal irrigation in its programme. ACC Minister Ruth Dyson was taken by surprise when Mr Peters raised the course in Parliament. Asked by the NZ First leader how "such seemingly pointless exercises" could assist with rehabilitation, she said she would investigate. "It is new information to me. It is information that I find very interesting and I will be following it up with some vigour." A woman who answered the phone at Alpha Consultants referred The Dominion Post to ACC Sourced & Reproduced from: http://stuff.co.nz/stuff/dominionpost/0,2106,2854719a6000,00.html
  12. admin

    Full FlowChart

    Full FlowChart Reproduced from ACCprotection com - We believe the designer/author of the Full flowchart is Alan Thomas. Thank you
  13. admin

    Basic FlowChart

    Basic FlowChart Reproduced from ACCprotection.com - We believe the designer/author of the basic flowchart is Alan Thomas. Thank you https://web.archive.org/web/20130819020021/http://accprotection.com/flow_chart.htm
  14. admin

    Welcome!

    This site has been established on the principles that everyone has an equal opportunity to have their say whether it be questions for purposes of help or answers for the purpose of helping. Claimants Lawyers, Advocates, Support People/Organisations are also very welcome to be part of our community. > Registration 1 Sign-up by completing the registration form 2 Confirm your email address 3 Welcome. You're now part of our community 4 Any feedback & suggestions genuinely considered > Optional Do you want to be Verified as to being who you really are in the real world? 5 Contact the administrator He will let you know what to do to get Verified 6 Get verified Being a Verified Member shows guests and members that you are a real person behind the user-name
  15. This is the Code of Claimants Rights Right 1 You have the right to be treated with dignity and respect. (a) We will treat you with dignity and respect. (b) We will treat you with honesty and courtesy. (c) We will recognise that you may be under physical, emotional, social, or financial strain. Right 2 You have the right to be treated fairly, and to have your views considered. (a) We will treat you fairly. (b) We will listen to you and consider your views. (c) We will take into account, and be responsive to, any impairment you may have. Right 3 You have the right to have your culture, values, and beliefs respected. (a) We will be respectful of, and responsive to, the culture, values, and beliefs of Māori. (b) We will be respectful of, and responsive to, all cultures, values, and beliefs. Right 4 You have the right to a support person or persons. (a) We will welcome you and your support person(s) provided that the safety of all involved can be assured. Right 5 You have the right to effective communication. (a) We will communicate with you openly, honestly, and effectively. (b) We will respond to your questions and requests in a timely manner. (c) We will provide you with an interpreter when necessary and reasonably practicable. (d) We will provide information in a form which you can access, and in a timely manner. Right 6 You have the right to be fully informed. (a) We will provide information on how to make a claim for cover and entitlements. (b) We will keep you fully informed. (c) We will provide you with full and correct information about your claim, entitlements, obligations, and responsibilities. (d) We will inform you if your entitlements change. (e) We will give you information about how we provide services, and how to access them. (f) We will discuss expected time frames with you. (g) We will inform you of your review and appeal rights under the Act. Right 7 You have the right to have your privacy respected. (a) We will respect your privacy. (b We will comply with all relevant legislation relating to privacy. (c) We will give you access to your information, in accordance with legislation. Right 8 You have the right to complain. (a) We will work with you to address problems and concerns. (b We will inform you about options available for resolving problems and concerns. (c) We will inform you about the complaints process, and the normal time frames for dealing with complaints.
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